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Measuring ROI of Customer Centricity-Changes in Customer Value

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Customer executives are regularly challenged to prove the value of their initiatives. To demonstrate value, executives must speak the language of business so as to allow business leaders to make comparisons and tradeoffs. Executives are primarily interested in increasing revenue, decreasing costs, and mitigating risk. To effectively demonstrate value, customer executives need to show how their customer initiatives impact one or more of these key factors. In my previous post I described the historical retrospective approach whereby incremental per-customer or per–segment revenue gains are correlated with increasing loyalty and engagement. Expected change in customer value is another valuable means of demonstrating ROI.

Many companies use lifetime customer value to justify marketing and customer acquisition efforts. Similarly, positive changes in lifetime value are a result of increased preference, decreased price sensitivity, increased consumption, and greater advocacy. Conversely, lifetime value plummets in response to negative experiences as consumption drops and referrals cease.

A number of years ago, JetBlue analyzed NPS results correlated with passenger behavior and found that each detractor converted to promoter is worth $40 additional profit and each 1-point overall NPS gain yields a $5-8M increase in annual revenue. Highly satisfied customers increase their use of ancillary services such as seat upgrades, box food purchases, etc. Converting a detractor to a promoter yields an additional $100-140 per customer annually, or the equivalent of another flight traveled each year plus ancillary service purchases. Conversely, negative word of mouth costs the company $104 per detractor per year in missed revenue: $72 in lost referrals and $32 in unpurchased ancillary services. 

Put another way, every 25 customers actively promoting JetBlue to friends, family, associates, and on social media equates to one new customer flying JetBlue, whereas only 16 detractors would dissuade an existing customer from flying.  By the same math, it might take 36,000 promoters to increase revenue by $1M, but only 14,000 detractors to realize a revenue loss of $1M.  Every customer value quantification effort must begin with a tangible understanding for each key segment of the length of average customer relationships, costs of new customer acquisition, average customer value, and retention rates. 

Enrich these data by examining how your most loyal and engaged customers within critical segments behave differently than your least engaged. Examine factors such as overall profitability, repeat purchase frequency and volume, longevity, share of wallet, breadth of product portfolio purchased (i.e. the ancillary services mentioned above), the number and value of new customers acquired through references and referrals provided each year. For many companies the annual value of these computations are significant and become even more so when extrapolated over the average lifetime of a customer. 

Similarly, the cost of dissatisfied customers can be computed to measure the cost of status quo.  What is the cost of each call into the call center? How many callbacks are required to address the same issue as a result of an inappropriate focus on average call handle time? What are the most common customer dissatisfiers and what does it cost to address them?  How many credits are being offered to correct billing mistakes?

Armed with tangible proof of the ROI of investments in customer centricity, customer executives can have meaningful conversations with top leadership, enabling them to compare such investments against other priorities and make the best decisions for the company. Without these measures, “doing the right thing” will only happen in the best of times and most certainly not in the worst of times when it is most needed.

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Categories: Chief Customer Officer | Consumer Spending | Customer Centricity | Customer Engagement | Customer Loyalty | Customer Retention

The Tweet Heard 'Round the World

Tuesday, April 08, 2014
Reflect back with me to April 19, 1775... 
 
With the might of the British Empire behind them, the British infantry believed it was utterly invincible. Imagine its surprise when it became surrounded by the Minute Men and later, many more of the American colonists. In the tension that followed, one nervous British infantryman fired upon the colonists, which started an exchange of fire from both sides. With this one shot that later became known as the shot heard 'round the world, the revolutionary war had begun.
 
Slightly more recently, in September of 2013, Chicago-based business owner and Twitter user Hasan Syed made history after British Airways lost his parents luggage on a flight from Chicago to Paris. Syed did something nobody has ever done before: he bought a series of promoted tweets on Twitter to express his frustration and displeasure.
 
Don't fly @BritishAirways. Their customer service is horrendous 
 
Checkout @British_Airways state-of-the-art baggage handling system [with photo of horse and buggy]
 
@British_Airways is the worst airline ever. Lost my luggage and can't even track it down Absolutely pathetic
 
A full 7 hours later, @British_Airways responded:
 
Sorry for the delay in responding, our twitter feed is open 09:00-17:00 GMT. Please DM [direct message] your baggage ref and we'll look into this.
 
By any account, Syed is no social media powerhouse. As of February 2014, he still had only 1,129 followers and 436 tweets. The sponsored tweet, however, for which he spent $1,000.00, yielded 76,000 impressions and 14,000 engagements (replies, retweets, etc.), all of which sided with him against the brand or broadcast their own, similar stories. Syed's tweet also quickly entered the news cycle, where his story appeared on BBC News, Time, Fox News, the Guardian, NBC News, Mashable, Huffington Post, and others.
 
With Hasan Syed's "tweet heard 'round the world" on September 2, 2013, the revolutionary war for customer control of your brand had begun. That same day, Andy Witt (@designingWell) tweeted:
 
What if patients were more forward and public with their frustration with hospitals like Hasan Syed was with @British_Airways?
 
Just like the British regulars, big companies have long thought they were utterly invincible-they controlled the messages, the media, and the conversations with their customers, when they bothered to have them. But to Andy Witt's point, what if one (or more) of your key customers - by size, revenue, influence, or other criterion - broadcast their frustration with your company to the public and to your other customers? What would the impact on your brand look like? Would it be inconsequential? Or could it cost millions of dollars in advertising to rectify?
 
Let's be honest. The age of cool products and feel-good service has come and gone. Social media, with all it empowers, is here to stay and still growing. It is not enough to listen to and pacify customers. Now, more than ever, reputations and relationships with customers can be tarnished, if not destroyed, with a few simple keystrokes. Customers are taking charge. They clearly want a voice.
 
We've entered the age of engagement. Today we have to engage the Hasan Syed's of the world: collaborate with them to help fix our problems and enlist them as our sales force to dramatically grow our businesses. In the days ahead, the most successful companies will grow only as they engage customers in customer acquisition, retention, operations, innovation, and even strategy.

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Categories: Customer Engagement | Customer Insight | Customer Loyalty | Customer Retention

Customer Engagement Models: Riot Games

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Many companies today have developed paths to greater engagement and greater profitability through recruiting the involvement of their customers. To restate the definition of engagement: it is the extent of a customer's willingness to invest his/her discretionary time for a mutual benefit, and particularly for the benefit of a business.

Established in Southern California in 2006, Riot Games is a US-based publisher best known for its multiplayer online battle arena title, League of Legends. As a testament to the level of engagement Riot Games has achieved with its player base, today the average percentage of new players that come through word of mouth is between 85 and 90%. A significant contributor to this engagement is structural: Riot created a game that's simply more fun to play with friends. Players recruit their friends to play with them because they enjoy a better gaming experience.

One of Riot's most outstanding examples of player engagement can be found within the process by which it enables its player community to recognize and manage negative in-game behavior, called the Tribunal. The game is played in sessions that last anywhere from 20 to 50 minutes at a time. At the end of each session, if a player behaved exhibited any unsportsmanlike behavior such as berating teammates or name calling, the other players can report him. When enough reports are filed against an individual - a number based upon the ratio of reports filed to total games played - a case file comprised of chat logs (in game instant-messaging), statistics, game data, activity, etc. is generated.

This case is displayed at random to members of the tribunal; other players in the community who have voluntarily chosen to participate in regulating and weighing in on community behavior. Through the constructive feedback of peers, Riot attempts to optimize teamwork, cooperation and positive player experiences. The best outcome is for a player to never show up at the tribunal again. Therefore, all systems are designed to adjust, not punish, behavior by allowing players equal ability to reward their peers for positive behavior by 'honoring' them after a game. When players do actually get punished, they are sent all the details in their case files: what they did, how others felt about it, why it had a negative impact on player experience, and why it was bad.

In Riot's example, it is peers - fellow players - who are applying and enforcing standards of appropriate gaming behavior; they are devoting their discretionary time to preserve the quality of experience for everyone. This strengthens the community, gives it greater credibility and authority, and at the same time frees company resources to be spent on more valuable opportunities. It also fosters greater engagement by players and a stronger commitment to the game's ecosystem.

*This post is excerpted from The Bingham Advisory: The Customer Engagement Trajectory, available for free download from the CCO Council website here.

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Categories: Customer Engagement | Customer Insight | Customer Loyalty | Customer Retention

Customer Engagement Models: Oracle

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Oracle has hundreds of thousands of customers and dozens of customer programs. It measures customer engagement of its biggest accounts on an account-by-account basis. The company focuses on those top accounts that, combined, contribute the clear majority of Oracle’s annual revenue. The company has identified the eight customer programs that have the highest correlation to satisfaction, loyalty, referenceability, and revenue. The measure of engagement then is the number of these programs in which a top customer participates.

Overall engagement is measured along a continuum that begins with the transactional buyer (least engaged), increases through the buyer who is engaged in customer programs, further increases through the buyer who is partnering with the company on product roadmaps and strategies, and culminates in the buyer who is an advocate for the company (most engaged). Participation in only a couple of key programs places a customer at the transactional end of the continuum; participation in most of them places a customer at the advocate end. The company continuously measures revenue across key customers because it believes that it is easier to gain incremental revenue from existing customers than to acquire new customers and it has determined that there is a cause and effect relationship between engagement and incremental revenue. In fact, Oracle’s most-engaged are generating approximately three times the revenue of transactional buyers.

Oracle is actively partnering with their customers to improve the business. More than 7,000 of Oracle’s customers are involved in some sort of an advisory board. Some of them are executive level advisory boards, and some are product-oriented, defining product features and functionalities. Participants are expected to meet minimum meeting participation requirements. Should people be unable to participate, Oracle will allow the customer to retire from that board to make room for a more active participant.

At the advocacy end of Oracle’s engagement continuum, more than 600 Oracle customers were involved in a significant speaking engagement on the company’s behalf during fiscal year 2013. Those 600 are of the over 15,000 customers who are actively involved in referencing for Oracle under an agreed-on, individualized customer reference plan. Engagements range from Oracle’s own OpenWorld conference to participating in an advertising or product launch campaign or leading a best practices discussion with other customers and prospects. A significant segment of those speakers are senior level executives--influential people from influential brands.

Oracle also examines what content is created when determining how engaged its advocacy-level customers are. Content can come in many forms, including written and video content. During fiscal year 2013, in total Oracle produced almost 5,000 pieces of content with its engaged customers, including testimonials, case studies, fact sheets, videos, and advertisements. Furthermore, Oracle measures two facets of advocacy in its engaged customers. The first applies to customers that are even willing to engage in advocacy activities, whether or not they actually do so. The second applies to customers that are not only willing, but also actively involved in advocacy efforts such as developing content or speaking.

In summary, Oracle’s efforts are focused on engaging as much as possible those customers who are among the top contributors to annual revenue and who are already demonstrating a willingness to engage in customer programs. The company further targets customers on the basis of how much of what they spend is potentially attainable by Oracle. Finally, Oracle also looks at systematically increasing engagement with customers who represent the strongest brands in the world. Underpinning all of Oracle’s customer engagement efforts is the conviction that increasing the percentage of the customer’s spend with Oracle is more profitable than acquiring new customers.

*This post is excerpted from The Bingham Advisory: The Customer Engagement Trajectory, available for free download from the CCO Council website here.

 

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Categories: Chief Customer Officer | Customer Centricity | Customer Insight | Customer Loyalty | Customer Retention | Customer Survey | Customer Engagement

Announcing the Latest Bingham Advisory

Thursday, January 09, 2014

I'm beginning 2014 with the exciting announcement of a new Bingham Advisory: The Customer Engagement Trajectory.

Based on my work and discussions with Council members and senior customer executives, this latest edition reveals how customer engagement is defined, how it can be measured, and where it emerges in the business-customer relationship to provides its greatest value. In addition, I share interesting details about how real world companies such as MetLife, Oracle, and Riot Games are engaging their customers and enjoying bottom line improvements to revenue and shareholder value as a result.

Download your free copy here and follow my blog where I'll be posting excerpts over the next few weeks.

 

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Categories: Chief Customer Officer | Customer Centricity | Customer Loyalty | Customer Retention

Assess the Scene

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Over the past number of years I’ve taken my wife and three teenage children on extended backpacking trips. Well aware of the risk of injury in the wilderness, I attended a wilderness first aid course. One key principle was drilled into me over and over again: Assess the scene. Often, those first on the scene of an accident rush in to help, jeopardizing their own safety or worse, causing greater harm to any victims. Similarly, customer executives and especially chief customer officers need to “assess the scene” before pushing their agenda to create a customer-centric culture.

Although we as customer executives might be tempted to argue that creating a customer-centric culture should come first and foremost, in situations of high stress, it is inevitably shoved to the back burner. A physician can’t help you with your diet when you are in a diabetic coma any more than the fire department can teach safe driving habits while they are extricating you from a wrecked car. Just as the time for preventive measures is long before the accident, attention to culture must take place before the crisis.

However, when a crisis does arise, effective CCOs will choose their battles carefully, sometimes pausing the long game and helping to put out the fires. The first thing they will do is assess the scene to determine where in the company assistance is most needed and how best to provide it. Successful customer executives will:

  1. Identify the most dissatisfied customers at risk of churn through whatever means possible (engagement measures, account team reports, escalations, surveys, social media, etc.).
  2. Prioritize and connect with the highest priority customers to discover issues and needs, be they urgent or latent.
  3. Gather a cross-functional team to understand, assess, prioritize, and resolve issues. Most importantly, the team must close the loop with customers, either indicating that the issues will not be addressed or providing a time frame for their resolution and ultimately delivering on that promise.

As is said in political arenas, “Never waste a good crisis.” A crisis is hardly the time to focus on creating a customer-centric culture. However, by understanding and leveraging customers to weather a crisis, customer executives foster goodwill and lay the groundwork for an increased focus on customers after the crisis has passed. Once in the clear, CCOs are in a much stronger position to enlist the larger organization in preventing future crises.

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Categories: Customer Centricity | Customer Retention | Chief Customer Officer